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New Protein May Trigger Fat Burning


11/28/2013 12:15 PM ET
Scientists have discovered a protein that could trigger the burning of fat in the body. In the study, carried out by a research team at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna, scientists found that a specific chemical compound can activate an uncoupling protein called UCP1 (found in brown fatty tissue) which could trigger fat burning in adults.
Study researcher Elena Pohl noted: "If we can find out how to regulate this protein, we might also find a way to trigger fat burning in the body."
Dr. Pohl was careful to add, however, that previous attempts at using substances similar to UCP1 to accelerate the human metabolism have caused patients serious or lethal side effects, with the products pulled from the market.
Nonetheless, she said: "If we are able to regulate UCP1 in a controlled way, it might be different story."
The results of the study are published in the journal "PLOS One

Obesity, Poor Metabolic Health Raise Risk Of CVD


Obese individuals and normal weight individuals who are metabolically unhealthy face a greater risk of cardiovascular disease, according to research conducted at the University of Texas.
The study, published in the Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism, analyzed the results of the San Antonio Heart Study.
Metabolic unhealth is established by elevated blood pressure, elevated triglyceride and glucose levels, insulin resistance and decreased high-density lipprotein levels.
"Risk of developing diabetes rose in a stepwise fashion with increasing BMI," although "only metabolically healthy individuals had a graded increase in incident cardiovascular disease," wrote the study's authors.
"The risk of developing DM and CVD is increased in MUH-NW and MHO individuals. Screening for obesity and other metabolic abnormalities should be routinely performed in clinical practice to institute appropriate preventive measures," the authors added. 

Today's Children Are Fatter And Slower Than Previous Generation

  
Kids today are slower and less fit than their parents at the same age, according to research conducted by the American Heart Association. The study analyzed 50 previous studies taken between 1964 and 2010 that involved more than 25 million kids, ages 9 to 17, in 28 countries.
The team found that today's children are roughly 15 percent less aerobically fit than their parents at their age, and that their cardiovascular endurance has fallen about 6 percent per decade between 1970 and 2000.
"The most important type of fitness for good health is cardiovascular fitness, which is the ability to exercise vigorously for a long time, like running multiple laps around an oval track," said Grant Tomkinson, Ph.D., lead author of the study.
"We need to help to inspire children and youth to develop fitness habits that will keep them healthy now and into the future. They need to choose a range of physical activities they like or think they might like to try, and they need to get moving."

The study also found that in a mile run, kids today are about a minute and a half slower than their peers 30 years ago. 

Life May Be Prolonged By Eating Nuts Every Day


People who eat a handful of nuts each day may increase their life span, according to research conducted at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and the Harvard School of Public Health. The study, published the New England Medicine of Journal, surveyed data on nearly 120,000 people over a 30-year period.

The nut eaters were more slender than their non-nut eating counterparts, and less likely to suffer from the most common/dangerous health risks, the study showed.
"The most obvious benefit was a reduction of 29 percent in deaths from heart disease - the major killer of people in America," said Charles S. Fuchs, MD, MPH, director of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Treatment Center at Dana-Farber, the senior author of the report.
"But we also saw a significant reduction - 11 percent - in the risk of dying from cancer," added Fuchs, who is also affiliated with the Channing Division of Network Medicine at Brigham and Women's.

The team found that several types of nuts (e.g. walnuts, hazelnuts, almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, macadamias, pecans, cashews, pistachios and pine nuts) brought the same benefits to their consumers

Lower Brown Fat Content May Put Asians At Risk For Diabetes

People of Asian descent may be at an increased risk for diabetes because of a lack of brown fat cell or brown adipose tissue, according to a new study from researcher in the Netherlands.

BAT cells are created as a means to store the body's excess energy, but unlike white fat cells they are burned to create heat when the body is cold. To examine the lack of BAT cells on Asians, the researchers compared 12 Asian men to 12 Caucasian men. Overall, the Asian men had 34 percent less BAT than the white men, and they resting energy consumption was also lower.

This lower energy consumption could also be linked with a decrease in the clearance of glucose for the blood, which is trigger of diabetes:

"We recently showed that BAT can be recruited in humans following 10 days of cold intervention. Future studies should be directed towards the efficacy of this strategy, as well as other options, such as medication, to increase BAT volume or activity," the researchers said. 

Diabetes kills 1 person every 6 seconds, expected to rise 55%




By Albertina Torsoli, Bloomberg NewsBloomberg

GENEVA — Diabetes kills one person every six seconds and afflicts 382 million people worldwide, according to the International Diabetes Federation, which has been canvassing the help of people ranging from celebrity chef Jamie Oliver to Bob Marley's nephew to raise awareness about the problem.
The number of diabetes cases has climbed 4.4 percent over the past two years, according to new figures the Brussels-based federation released Thursday. The number of people affected by the disease is expected to climb 55 percent to 592 million by 2035 as factors including poor diet, a more sedentary lifestyle, increases in obesity and life expectancy fuel an epidemic, it said. There were only 285 million sufferers worldwide in 2009.
"We haven't seen any kind of stabilizing, any kind of reversal," Leonor Guariguata, an epidemiologist and project coordinator for IDF's Diabetes Atlas, published every two years, said in a phone interview. "Diabetes continues to be a very big problem and is increasing even beyond previous projections."
The disease, caused by a lack of insulin the body needs to convert blood sugar into energy, is becoming a financial burden on governments, and led to $548 billion in global health-care spending this year, the federation said. To counter the surge, it recommends policy makers across many sectors should devise concerted action.
Jamie Oliver and Charles Mattocks, Bob Marley's nephew, are among celebrities that have been helping IDF advocate the need for healthy living. TV celebrity Oliver, who has sold more than 30 million cookbooks and owns restaurants from London to Sydney, has appeared in IDF's magazine Diabetes Voice while Mattocks, also a chef, is currently touring the U.S. in a camper to speak about the benefits of a healthy lifestyle and eating habits.
"It's all about awareness, awareness and awareness," Mike Doustdar, Senior Vice President of Novo Nordisk, the world's biggest insulin maker, said during a webcast co-hosted with IDF before the announcement. "Diabetes is a silent disease, so the best thing we can do about it is to talk about it."
The call is not going unheard. Health officials from almost 200 countries in May adopted nine targets, such as reducing average daily salt consumption by 30 percent by 2025, in a bid to fight cancer, heart disease and diabetes, and called for curbs on marketing unhealthy food to children under a plan to cut the world's leading causes of death.
More help is needed. IDF estimates that 5.1 million people die annually because of the disease, with an average 10 million diabetes cases emerging every year. The majority of cases affects 40- to 59-year-olds, according to IDF. Every year, diabetes also leads to more than 1 million amputations, 500,000 kidney failures and 1.5 million cases of blindness, according to a slide provided by Novo Nordisk.
The spread of the disease has increased faster than the world's population, which exceeds 7 billion and has increased 2.2 percent in two years, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates.
"More younger adults are developing diabetes," Guariguata said. "That's telling us that the pace of the epidemic is faster than the pace of change of demographics alone."
The new projections may not even be giving a full picture of the situation, according to the federation.
"These are probably substantial underestimates of what the real problem is," Paul Zimmet, honorary president of IDF and director emeritus of the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne, said in an interview before the announcement. "You can only work on the information that's available to work on."
Four of every five people with diabetes are in developing countries where there aren't big studies to work with, he added.
In China, recent figures showed that the epidemic being much worse than previously estimated. The most comprehensive nationwide survey for diabetes ever conducted in the Asian country showed 12 percent of adults, or 114 million people, have the disease. The finding, published Sept. 4 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, added 22 million diabetics, equivalent to the population of Australia, to a 2007 estimate. That means almost one in three diabetes sufferers globally is in China.
The China study wasn't included in the Atlas figures presented Thursday for lack of time, IDF said.
The problem is bigger in poorer regions that have fewer resources at hand to fight the diseases, for example South Africa, and where more people die of disease before the age of 60, Guariguata said.

"These are preventable deaths, premature deaths that don't have to occur," she said.

New Diabetes Testing Guidelines Set For Pregnant Women

The Endocrine Society has released a new collection of guidelines for diabetes testing in pregnant women. According to the group, only about one quarter of the gestational diabetes cases in American are diagnosed, potentially increasing the risk of complications in pregnancy.
The new guidelines are part of the Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG). The group explained the new recommendations in a statement:
"Many women have type 2 diabetes but may not know it. Because untreated diabetes can harm both the pregnant woman and the fetus, it is important that testing for diabetes be done early on in pregnancy so that if diabetes is found, appropriate steps can be immediately undertaken to keep both the woman and her fetus healthy." 

Health Benefits Of Wild Blueberries Confirmed In New Study

Wild blueberries are a good source of phytochemicals called polyphenols, an organic compound associated with several benefits, according to research conducted at the University of Maine.
The study, published in the journal Applied Physiology, demonstrated that a diet rich in blueberries may improve conditions associated metabolic syndrome, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes.
"The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a group of risk factors characterized by obesity, hypertension, inflammation, dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction," said Dr. Klimis-Zacas, a Professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Maine and a co-author of the study.
"Mets affects an estimated 37 percent of adults in the US. Many substances found in food have the potential to prevent MetS, thus reducing the need for medication and medical intervention."
The team gave lab rats the human equivalent of two cups of wild blueberries per day. The rats showed an improved balance between the relaxing and constricting factors of the vascular wall, improved blood pressure and blood flow regulation. 

Diabetes Kills One Person Every Six Seconds, Estimates Show

By Albertina Torsoli


Diabetes kills one person every six seconds and afflicts 382 million people worldwide, according to the International Diabetes Federation, which has been canvassing the help of people ranging from celebrity chef Jamie Oliver to Bob Marley’s nephew to raise awareness about the problem. 

The number of diabetes cases has climbed 4.4 percent over the past two years and is more than 5 percent of the world’s population, according to new figures the Brussels-based federation released today. The number of people affected by the disease is expected to climb 55 percent to 592 million by 2035 as factors including poor diet, a more sedentary lifestyle, increases in obesity and life expectancy fuel an epidemic, it said. There were only 285 million sufferers worldwide in 2009. 
“We haven’t seen any kind of stabilizing, any kind of reversal,” Leonor Guariguata, an epidemiologist and project coordinator for IDF’s Diabetes Atlas, published every two years, said in a phone interview. “Diabetes continues to be a very big problem and is increasing even beyond previous projections.” 

The disease, caused by a lack of insulin the body needs to convert blood sugar into energy, is becoming a financial burden on governments, and led to $548 billion in global health-care spending this year, the federation said. To counter the surge, it recommends policy makers across many sectors should devise concerted action. 

Celebrity Action 

Jamie Oliver and Charles Mattocks, Bob Marley’s nephew, are among celebrities that have been helping IDF advocate the need for healthy living. TV celebrity Oliver, who has sold more than 30 million cookbooks and owns restaurants from London to Sydney, has appeared in IDF’s magazine Diabetes Voice while Mattocks, also a chef, is currently touring the U.S. in a camper to speak about the benefits of a healthy lifestyle and eating habits. 

“It’s all about awareness, awareness and awareness,” Mike Doustdar, Senior Vice President of Novo Nordisk A/S (NOVOB), the world’s biggest insulin maker, said during a webcast co-hosted with IDF before the announcement. “Diabetes is a silent disease, so the best thing we can do about it is to talk about it.” 

The call is not going unheard. Health officials from almost 200 countries in May adopted nine targets, such as reducing average daily salt consumption by 30 percent by 2025, in a bid to fight cancer, heart disease and diabetes, and called for curbs on marketing unhealthy food to children under a plan to cut the world’s leading causes of death. 

Toll Rises 

More help is needed. IDF estimates that 5.1 million people die annually because of the disease, with an average 10 million diabetes cases emerging every year. The majority of cases affects 40- to 59-year-olds, according to IDF. Every year, diabetes also leads to more than 1 million amputations, 500,000 kidney failures and 1.5 million cases of blindness, according to a slide provided by Novo Nordisk. 

The spread of the disease has increased faster than the world’s population, which exceeds 7 billion and has increased 2.2 percent in two years, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates. 

“More younger adults are developing diabetes,” Guariguata said. “That’s telling us that the pace of the epidemic is faster than the pace of change of demographics alone.” 

The new projections may not even be giving a full picture of the situation, according to the federation. 

Underestimated Issue? 

“These are probably substantial underestimates of what the real problem is,” Paul Zimmet, honorary president of IDF and director emeritus of the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne, said in an interview before the announcement. “You can only work on the information that’s available to work on.” 

Four of every five people with diabetes are in developing countries where there aren’t big studies to work with, he added. 

In China, recent figures showed that the epidemic being much worse than previously estimated. The most comprehensive nationwide survey for diabetes ever conducted in the Asian country showed 12 percent of adults, or 114 million people, have the disease. The finding, published Sept. 4 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, added 22 million diabetics, equivalent to the population of Australia, to a 2007 estimate. That means almost one in three diabetes sufferers globally is in China. 

The China study wasn’t included in the Atlas figures presented today for lack of time, IDF said. 

The problem is bigger in poorer regions that have fewer resources at hand to fight the diseases, for example South Africa, and where more people die of disease before the age of 60, Guariguata said. 

“These are preventable deaths, premature deaths that don’t have to occur,” she said. 

To contact the reporter on this story: Albertina Torsoli in Geneva at atorsoli@bloomberg.net 


To contact the editor responsible for this story: Phil Serafino at pserafino@bloomberg.net 

Diabetes and TB interlinked, say doctors

In more bad news for people diagnosed with diabetes, the lifestyle disease has now been linked to an increased incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in patients.

According to the government-run Revised National TB Control Programme (RNTCP), people with diabetes have a two-three times higher risk of TB compared to people without diabetes and about 10 per cent of TB cases globally are linked to diabetesDiabetes, which is characterized by high levels of glucose in the blood and the inability of the body to regulate blood sugar levels, is an independent risk factor for all lower respiratory tract infections, doctors said.
"The link between diabetes and tuberculosis is a recent knowledge and the subject of much research. Studies show that diabetes can lead to TB and the reverse is also true," Anoop Mishra, chairman Fortis Centre of Excellence for Diabetes Metabolic Diseases and Endocrinology (CDOC), said.
People with diabetes who are diagnosed with TB, an infectious disease of the lungs, have a higher risk of death during TB treatment and of TB relapse after treatment is over.
"Diabetes is complicated by the presence of infectious diseases like TB," Mishra added.
Doctors are, therefore, increasingly screening both diabetes and TB patients for the two diseases, he added.
The reason behind diabetes patients easily contracting TB is the low immunity in them that results in high chances of infection.
India has a high burden of both diabetes and tuberculosis. In India, there are nearly 50 million diabetics, according to the statistics of the International Diabetes Federation - a global advocate for the promotion of diabetes care, prevention and cure.
The federation had declared that India was emerging as the diabetes capital of the world.
India has approximately two to three million people infected with Tuberculosis.
According to Rajeev Chawla of the North Delhi Diabetes Centre: "Previously there was a link between diabetes and HIV, but now we can see a link between diabetes and TB. Diabetes and TB can be seen to co-exist in many cases."
"If a patient develops diabetes, it can also lead to reactivation of his or her TB which has been cured earlier.
"Diabetics should avoid contact with TB patients and always keep their blood sugar levels under check," Chawla said.
Also, in a large proportion of people, diabetes as well as TB is not diagnosed or is diagnosed too late.
Diabetes can lengthen the time to sputum culture conversion and theoretically this could lead to the development of drug resistance in TB patients, the doctor added.
Experts say the incidence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, especially in developing countries where TB is most prevalent.
Therefore, the convergence of these two epidemics is most likely to occur in the places with the least amount of healthcare resources, the doctors added.
Mishra said diabetic patients should maintain their blood sugar level in the best possible manner, exercise regularly, have proper diets and ensure that they get enough of Vitamin D

Many Diabetes Patients Don't Receive Recommended Eye Exams

As many as 25 percent of the diabetes patients in the United States may be unaware that an annual eye is recommended for people with their condition, according to a new study from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control.
The eye exams are aimed at diagnosing diabetic eye disease, which is one of the most common forms of advanced eye disease in the country. Patients of the illness often have no symptoms until the condition is fully developed, according to Dr. Carl Awh of Tennessee Retina.
"The best way to prevent unnecessary vision loss is through annual retina eye exams," Awh said. "Very often diabetic eye disease lacks any symptoms - meaning people may not know that their vision has been damaged until it's too 

FDA To Ban Remaining Trans Fats In Foods

The FDA has announced that it plans to ban partially hydrogenated vegetable oils from all food products.
Speaking at a presser, FDA commish Margaret Hamburg said that the oils "are not generally recognized as safe for use in food."
According to CDC figures, the ban could prevent an additional 7,000 deaths from heart disease each year and up to 20,000 heart attacks each year.
Consumption of trans fats is down significantly over the past decade. In 2003 the average American consumed about 4.6 grams per day, while in 2012 that number was down to one gram.
"While consumption of potentially harmful artificial trans fat has declined over the last two decades in the United States, current intake remains a significant public health concern," Hamburg added.
Partially hydrogenated vegetable oils are made when hydrogen is added to liquid oils to make solid fats. The concoction increases the shelf life and flavor of foods like frozen pizza, coffee creamer and margarine. 

Tax On Sugary Drinks Could Lower Obesity Rate

Introducing a 20 percent tax on sugary drinks may help in the battle against obesity, according to research conducted at the University of Oxford and Reading. The study, published in the BMJ, suggested such a measure could reduce the obesity rate by 1.3 percent in the U.K.
The reduction, added the study's authors, would come in the 18 to 29 age group, who also happen to be the largest consumers of sugar-sweetened drinks.
"This is important to communicate to both the public and policymakers, who see the tax as a blanket measure on obesity," wrote Adam Briggs from the British Heart Foundation health promotion research group at Oxford University."Taxation represents a measure to target population obesity, particularly among young people, but should not be seen as a panacea."
Researchers noted that the tax would raise about $442 million per year, which could be used for health awareness initiatives. 

Diabetes Risk Tied to Weight Gain in Youth

The risk of developing diabetes in adulthood is associated with weight in adolescence and weight gain during the teens and early 20s, researchers reported.

In a longitudinal cohort of teens and young adults, the timing of the weight gain also appeared to play a role in diabetes risk, according to Penny Gordon-Larsen, PhD, and colleagues at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.

On the other hand, hypertension in adulthood was associated just with adult body mass index (BMI), while inflammation was linked only to increasing BMI, Gordon-Larsen and colleagues reported in the November issue of Obesity.

Diabetes, insulin production and suppressed immune-supressant need


German doctors have successfully implanted insulin-producing cells in a patient with Type 1 diabetes using a specially constructed chamber system that does not require the use of immunosuppresant drugs, according to a new study.
In a paper published Monday in the journal PNAS, researchers said the islets, or clusters of cells, remained alive for 10 months and were not rejected by the 56-year-old patient's immune system. However, the implantation offered only moderate health improvements and requires further refinement.
"This approach may allow for future widespread application of cell-based therapies," wrote lead author Dr. Barbara Ludwig of the German Center for Diabetes Research in Dresden and her colleagues.
Diabetes mellitus Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that results in irreversible destruction of insulin-producing beta cells. Attempts to implant donor cells have met with two large hurdles: lack of eligible donors and the need for lifelong medication to suppress the body's immune system and prevent it from destroying the implanted cells.
The plastic disk-like device, which resembles a small puck or air-freshener, measures just more than 2 1/2 inches in diameter and more than half an inch thick. Within the container are two layers of donor cells surrounded by alginate, a semi-permeable coating that allows the cells to secrete insulin. The insulin exits the plastic disc through numerous perforations.
Two layers of cells are separated by an oxygen capsule that must be refilled daily by the patient through a tube, or port. The oxygen is able to permeate the protective alginate that surrounds the donor cells.
The patient was a 56-year-old mathemetician who has been involved with the development of other diabetese technology. He carried the implant for 10 months before it was removed and examined by doctors.
The removed cells were intact and healthy, according to researchers, and the implant itself was "well tolerated" by the patient, authors said. "Despite the absence of using any immunosuppressive agents, no signs of graft rejection or immune sensitization of the recipient were observed," the authors wrote.
The implanted cells showed evidence of insulin production but showed only a "minimal systemic effect."
Authors say that performance may be improved by adding more cells to the device and by placing it deeper in the patient's abdomen.

Diabetes Day event aims to help Montanans manage disease

October 30, 2013 8:45 pm  • 
An event geared toward helping people with diabetes successfully manage their disease will take place Saturday at Providence St. Patrick Hospital.
The free Control is the Goal Diabetes Day event begins at 7 a.m., when 20 exhibitors and vendor information tables open, and lectures are set to begin at 8 a.m. at the Broadway Building. Free breakfast is available from 7 to 9 a.m., with lunch at noon.
Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death for Americans, said Jennifer Troupe, program coordinator for Providence Medical Group Diabetes Care and Prevention Center. The disease also is manageable if people make sure to monitor their treatment and lifestyles, she said.
“They need a lot of support and a lot of information to be able to manage it,” she said, adding that’s where Saturday’s event comes in.
Upward of 6 percent of Montanans have diabetes, which is lower than the 8.3 percent national average, Troupe said.
However, many people likely have diabetes and don’t realize it yet.
“I think all of those numbers are very much underestimated,” she said.
About 30 percent of Montanans have pre-diabetes, with the number of people with diabetes expected to jump to one in three people by 2050. Also, Native Americans are 2.3 times more likely to have a diagnosis of diabetes, she added.
Saturday’s educational event is open to anyone with diabetes or pre-diabetes, anyone who lives with someone with diabetes or anyone who just wants to learn more about the disease, managing it and preventing it.
During the event, people can get a free A1C test, which measures their three-month blood sugar average. Attendees also will hear from leading experts in the diabetes field, as well as from experts in exercise and nutrition. Additionally, a mental health professional and patient will talk about behavior changes, which is often the most difficult thing for patients to do, Troupe said.
The event concludes with a panel discussion about the health insurance exchange and its impact on diabetes patients, as well as how patients can be smart consumers.

For more details about Diabetes Day, visit montana.providence.org/campaign/pmg-montana/diabetes-day or call 329-5781.

'Diabetes dog' easing life for young Kansas girl

— A southeast Kansas second-grader with Type 1 diabetes is now relying on a friendly Labrador retriever instead of an electronic glucose monitor to help track her blood sugar levels.
The family of 7-year-old Kyla Lankton picked up the four-legged health aide this month from the Canine Assistance Rehabilitation Education and Services (CARES) program in the north-central Kansas town of Concordia, The Iola Register reported (http://bit.ly/1hgkm0o ).

The 2-year-old female Lab, named Arley, is specially trained to detect a person's blood sugar level through her keen sense of smell.

Arley wears a read vest and accompanies Kyla everywhere in the town of Le Roy. If she sniffs a change in Kyla's blood sugar level, she licks the girl's face as a warning that her blood must be checked.
Kyla's father, Korey Lankton, says it's much less intrusive than an electronic glucose monitor, which he said is painful to check.

"She's a remarkable dog," Lankton said, "and they bonded almost instantly."
Kyla still must wear an insulin pump 24 hours a day and closely monitor her diet and activity levels. And Arley must be paid for.

Such "diabetes dogs" can be extremely expensive. Lankton, who teaches physical education and coaches football and basketball at Southern Coffey County High School, said Arley cost less than $10,000 but declined to be specific.

The Lanktons make monthly payments through their bank. But many residents of Le Roy are jumping in to help defray the costs.

A 4-H Club Kyla and her sister belong to is organizing a drawing for which businesses and individuals have donated such prizes as a lap quilt, processed beef, a holiday wreath and a gift card from a hardware store.
One shop is selling "Kyla's Guardian" T-shirts for $10, and footballs autographed by high school and middle school players will also be given away. The drawing will be held Oct. 31 at Southern Coffey County High's last home football game of the season.

"The community's response has been humbling," Korey Lankton said. "Their help has really been a stress-reliever for our family."

Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/2013/10/27/4580357/diabetes-dog-easing-life-for-young.html#storylink=cpy